Bath country club cover picture
Unknown picture

Bath Country Club

(0 reviews)

Bath, The United States

course description

Hole # 1: This relatively short par 5 can be a great way to start a round. A good tee shot makes the green reachable in two, but use caution, as anything too far left will leave you hitting three from the tee. When hitting your approach, try and keep your ball below the hole as the green slopes severely from back to the front. Hole # 2: A well-placed tee shot is the key to this one. Let your ball stray to the left, and you’ll find yourself with an awkward stance, which brings a greenside bunker into play. The right side of the fairway is preferred, but several small trees come into play if you’re too far right. Hole # 3: A straightforward par 4 whose only real danger is a tee shot hooked to the left where it can find the pond in front of #2 tee box. The approach shot is the key to scoring with a two-tiered green. It is imperative to get on the proper level. Hole # 4: The first of three holes that are Bath CC’s version of amen corner. This short, uphill, par three features an undulating green that requires a two-putt more often than not. Good luck saving par if you find yourself with anything but a putter in hand for your second shot. Hole # 5: The true monster at BCC! This par 5 has ruined many a round. Leave your ego and your driver in the cart, as a tee shot in play, is priority one. OB down the left side will sometimes spit out a wayward tee shot. A drop zone is provided for a long ball in the woods to the right. When hitting your second, consider going through the fairway leaving a straight uphill approach to a two-tiered green that slopes severely from left to right. If you find yourself on the wrong level of the green, or to the left of the hole, say a prayer and remember, there is still plenty of golf left. Hole # 6: This downhill par 3 can have some teeth if you haven’t been paying attention to the wind. An elevated tee box at the base of the woods shelters the player from feeling the wind. Take a quick look to your left at # 16 green to see what the flag is doing. A tee shot below and to the left of the hole will give a relatively straight look at birdie as the green slopes from back right to front left. Hole # 7 A big dogleg right that requires a well-placed tee shot. Don’t get too greedy with the trees that line the right side of the fairway, as whoever said trees are 90% air, has never played this hole. Hole # 8 This tough par 4 is yet another that requires a well-placed tee shot. Too far left and you’re view of the green will be blocked by the woods. Let your tee shot stray too far right, and you’ll have the same problem with a couple big trees, plus the ball will be below your feet. Hitting one long and down the middle doesn’t ensure a good lie either, as the fairway comes to a point and drops off in all directions. Hole # 9 This dogleg left, par four provides a good scoring opportunity if you can get your tee shot in the fairway. Too far right will leave you searching amongst range balls. Get too greedy to the left and several pesky trees can block your approach. Short right or left will give you an opportunity for a sand save. Hole # 10 Left is better than right from the tee, with the right side being OB over the railroad tracks. Avoid being blocked out by the trees down the right side of the fairway and you’ll have a green light to a receptive green. Hole # 11: A short par four where a wayward drive can be big trouble. Leave hitting from the pine needles to the pros and avoid the woods to the left. Pay close attention to your alignment on the tee box as it points you down the right side, which can leave you hitting three from the tee. Use caution when hitting an approach to a front pin as this green features a big false front. Hole # 12: A modest par three guarded by four greenside bunkers. The wind is again a big factor in club selection. Avoid going long, which will leave you chipping to a green that slopes from back to front. Hole # 13: The longest par four on the course. A good tee shot is the key to reaching the green in two. The preferred shot starts down the right side and works back left where it can find a speed slot in the fairway adding valuable yardage and providing a flat lie. This converted par five allows for a running approach with a green that has an accommodating backstop. Hole # 14: One of the most memorable holes at BCC. This downhill, dogleg-right design requires a good tee shot. Hit it through the fairway and you’ll be faced with an awkward stance. Get too greedy with the dogleg and you can find yourself in the woods. A tee shot too far left will leave you with a long approach to a green that features a lengthy pond to the right that will gladly accept your ball. Hole # 15: Our longest par three whose only real trouble is the woods to the right. The green features a backstop that will help hold your ball on the green. Hole # 16: A long par five that is only reachable in two by the big hitters. Tee shots favoring the left side will provide the best look up the fairway. Trying to overpower your drive and losing it to the right can leave you shouting to those on #13 tee box. Pick your favorite layup yardage for your second and avoid OB on the right. The green is another two-tiered monster that can be very tricky with a front pin placement. Hole # 17: Dogleg right, par four that requires a drive down the left side. The fairway slopes severely towards the woods to the right. Even if you can find a wayward tee shot along the fence, it will leave you with virtually no shot at reaching in two. The green features a generous backstop, so make sure not to leave your approach short. Hole # 18: This relatively short, dogleg left, par four is reachable from the tee by a big hitter. Trouble awaits if precision isn’t your game, with a fairway bunker and trees down the left side. The key to this one is picking the proper club on your approach as the green is three clubs deep.



0.0
No reviews yet for Bath Country Club
5
4
3
2
1

albums(1)

Bath country club cover picture

Cover pictures (3)

01 Sep 2016